Women and Imperialism

Today we visited the Tate Museum, the Victorian and Albert Museum, and Wilton’s Music Hall. Although I wish I could have spent a bit more time at the Tate, I still had a great time. I gained knowledge about the Victorian Era through paintings and sculptures. I love making connections to time periods through artwork because the art truly speaks for itself. At the Tate, a few paintings displayed the role of women in the Victorian Era. As you can see below, women were there for three main reasons; to comfort, to be a companion to a man, and to be mothers and guides. Our tour guide thoroughly explained and interpreted each painting to us. In one of the paintings, we can see that the woman’s physical position determines her character. She is pictured leaning on the man, which symbolizes her support for him and her dependence on him. These paintings can be interpreted in many different ways, but that was what I ultimately took away from them in regards to the role of women.

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The Victorian and Albert Museum was much more interesting than The Tate. It included artwork, sculptures, and artifacts from different countries, which were obtained through imperialism. I was particularly interested in the beginning of the tour as our tour guide spoke about British imperialism in India. I noticed that she seemed to be avoiding the term imperialism and using less harsh words to describe Great Britain’s involvement with India. It was very interesting to see how much influence India truly had on Great Britain. I especially enjoyed looking at the Indian artifacts and the Indian influence in the clothing we saw. Despite the horrors of imperialism, I really loved that the museum had multiple sections to display Indian history and culture.

 

My day ended with a trip to Westfield mall, where we went bowling and had dinner.

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